River Severn Net Limitation Order and Byelaws 2021

Closed 6 Apr 2021

Opened 5 Mar 2021

Results updated 13 Sep 2021

Confirmation of Severn Estuary and River Severn Salmon and Sea Trout Protection Byelaws 2021 and Environment Agency (Limitation Of Severn Estuary Lave Net Fishing Licences In England) Order 2021

The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has now considered our proposals, along with the objections and representations made during the consultation, and has approved the new regulations. This has resulted in a new net limitation order and rod fishing byelaws for the Severn fisheries. These byelaws are coming into force with immediate effect.

A copy of the confirmed, sealed byelaws is available here and the NLO here.

The technical case, text of the byelaws and text of the NLO, consultation responses and our response are still available for viewing below.

The 2020 salmon stock assessment shows stock levels for the River Severn catchment, continue to be significantly below conservation limits with the salmon stock is now assessed as “At Risk”. These declines in numbers means that every fish returned safely could contribute to improving the spawning population.

Reducing the taking of salmon by rods and nets is only one part of the Environment Agency’s larger programme to protect salmon stocks. Actions taken by the Environment Agency and its partners that contribute to protecting salmon stocks include removing barriers, improving water quality and agricultural practices, and addressing unsustainable water abstractions. Actions against these measures will be assessed annually in a Severn Salmon Action plan.

We believe that these regulations are proportionate and necessary to significantly reduce the number of salmon killed via rod or net fisheries and is only one element of fisheries management work designed to support salmon stock recovery.

These regulations are to protect stocks and we urge all to play part in the recovery of those stocks for the future.

 

Consultation responses - update May and June 2021

We asked: We consulted on the proposed new regulations that are designed to protect salmon and sea trout stocks in the River Severn as well as those stocks on the River Usk and Wye which contribute adult salmon that support the Severn estuary net fishery. We provided information on the salmon stock assessment, preferred fishery management options, technical case. Responses could be submitted online, by email or by post.

You said: The public consultation on the new proposed regulations ran for a period of one month from March to April 2021. The consultation resulted in 111 representations being made directly to the Environment Agency and Defra. Of those representations 40 fully supported all the proposed measures, while 58* objected to one or more elements of the proposed measures. We also received 10 “Don’t know” and 2 “not answered” to all elements, these are not included as either objection or support. (*an objection response received through the online consultation portal and as a written objection will count as 1 objection overall.)

We did: The response document aims to reply to the objections and representations raised through the public consultation process. The document draws on all representations received and is intended to clarify specific data used and decisions taken in formulating the proposed new regulations. It was circulated on 14 May 2021 to all those who responded.

Further information on our 14 May response:

The specific targeting of notification of the consultation via text messaging and email or letter directly to 337 anglers and 28 netsmen who have submitted catch returns from the Severn in recent years, provided a direct and immediate means of alerting relevant anglers to the consultation exercise. Additionally we notified more than 40 angling clubs, associations, MPs, NGOs and Parish Councils, and provided with them with information to forward, including posters to place in public areas and at fisheries. There was also an extensive press release which was taken up by regional and national media, as well a section in the Rod Licence Newsletter which was circulated to 7,000 salmon and sea trout licence holders.

The online consultation questions provided the opportunity for the 99 respondents to enter free text responses if they so wished. Alternative means of responding, either by email or letter, were also available if respondents were not satisfied with the online response tool or wished to raise any other issue or objection in relation to the consultation, proposed byelaw measures or technical case that considered the stock assessment.

In addition to the responses submitted via the online consultation tool, 12 representations were made directly to Defra and / or the Environment Agency. 8 submissions were from individuals; 3 from angling clubs and 1 from an angler’s representative organisation.

The concerns, objections and suggestions in those submissions have been addressed alongside the comments made to the online consultation.

The consultation exercise was aimed at seeking consultee views on the fishery management measures that have been advertised by the Environment Agency. If there was an objection, there was an opportunity for the consultee to provide an alternative option or object but in doing so, it was entirely reasonably expected that an objection be supported by justification for that position and if necessary, supporting evidence.

The response document provides a summary of the results from the online consultation, and summarises the written responses that were received. This has been done in three parts. The first provides breakdown of the online questions and some of the main responses either in support or objection to the questions that have been received. We have also provided a broad summary responding to additional information that respondents provided to these questions. The second part, are the response statements relating to points of objection that have been made in the written and online responses received. These are presented in the order of frequency with which they were raised as matters of concern by respondents to the consultation, and categorised under six main themes. The final part deals with statements to respondents relating to proposals or alternative management options which are collated into 5 general themes.

The response document has drawn on all representations received and is intended to clarify specific data used and decisions taken in formulating the proposed new regulations. We are confident that the killing of salmon by the Severn fisheries is not the main cause for the decline in salmon. However, managing and regulating exploitation must form part of the solution to ensure that numbers of salmon remain at levels that will allow populations to recover. The bigger issue is to understand and improve marine survival, though this is unlikely to be straightforward. Work is ongoing with NASCO (North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organisation), other European countries and partners, such as the Atlantic Salmon Trust, to help us understand why fewer salmon are returning from the marine part of their lifecycle.

Improving water quality and river flows are also important parts of our work locally and under the National multi-agency Salmon Five Point Approach to maximise the freshwater production of salmon smolts. This work is happening as part of wider water quality improvements from the Water Framework Directive legislative priorities. It is also part of water company improvements, and better regulatory legislation on contaminated land and waste. The recent launch of the Government’s 25 year plan, and Defra’s commitment to regulate farming to ensure greater environmental protection, particularly with respect to soil management, will also help to improve water quality and river flows.

Whilst we have made progress with the Salmon Five Point Approach, there are some areas that still need further consideration at a national level. There is no short term fix to improve salmon populations and we will continue to improve our understanding and deliver improvements for this valuable and iconic species. We will commit to produce a Severn action plan to deliver further improvements across the catchment for the benefit of salmon, this will be progressed in the coming months

Files:

Published responses

View submitted responses where consent has been given to publish the response.

Overview

We are consulting on the proposed new regulations that are designed to protect salmon and sea trout stocks in the River Severn as well as those stocks on the River Usk and Wye which contribute adult salmon that support the Severn estuary net fishery. The proposed measures include:

  • Severn Estuary and River Severn Salmon and Sea Trout Protection Byelaws 2021
  • Environment Agency (Limitation of Severn Estuary Lave Net Fishing Licences in England) Order 2021.

See below for an introduction, salmon stock assessment informationpreferred fishery management options and consultation details - including how to respond online, by email or post. Responses will be published below.

For those unable to access the internet to view this webpage, they can call 03708 506 506 to request a copy of the information be posted or emailed. Documents can be viewed at our offices in Tewkesbury, Kidderminster and Shrewsbury.

In the related documents section you can view copies of the Order, Byelaws and Technical Case.

Introduction to the proposals and consultation

The evidence from recent annual salmon stock assessments indicates a continued decline in the status of salmon in the River Severn. A decline has also been detected in the rivers Wye and Usk which contribute to the Severn estuary fishery, with substantial deficits in the number of spawning adults apparent on all three rivers.

Previous time-limited regulations for salmon and sea trout fishing on the River Severn for both rod and net fisheries need to be renewed and updated to ensure that salmon stocks are adequately protected. This is to ensure that those fisheries that continue to exploit these stocks do so in a sustainable manner to support stock recovery as quickly as possible.

We would like your views and any related evidence that may support the need to modify the proposed measures that we consider necessary to protect salmon stocks.

We would like to hear your thoughts on the salmon and sea trout stock assessments, the status of salmon stocks on the River Severn and proposed new regulations. Please provide data or evidence that you believe is relevant to justify your comments and which may justify the need to modify or strengthen the proposed measures.

Salmon Stock Assessment 2019

River Severn salmon populations have declined in recent years and are now falling below the Conservation Limit (CL) this a minimum target that is deemed necessary to sustain the populations at a healthy and sustainable level. The Severn salmon stock has regularly failed to achieve its CL and is now classified as being “Probably at Risk”, and is predicted to remain so in five years time.

Figure 1 River Severn salmon spawning compliance assessment 2019

Figure 1 River Severn salmon spawning compliance assessment 2019

Key to graph in figure 1

The CL defines the minimum number of fish we want to see spawning in the river (defined in terms of eggs deposited). The current egg deposition equates to 875 spawning adult females. The number of spawning female equivalent to the CL is 1720, indicating a shortfall of 845 spawning females in 2019.

The annual egg deposition, CL and MT for the Severn salmon stock for the last ten years are presented in Figure 2 below. The stock assessment indicates that the Severn salmon stock has only exceeded its CL in three of the last ten years, declining since 2015, to now only achieving a little over 50% of the CL in 2019.

Figure 2 Egg deposition estimates relative to the conservation limit and management target for the River Severn between 2010 and 2019

Figure 2 Egg deposition estimates relative to the conservation limit and management target for the River Severn between 2010 and 2019

To offer greater protection to the stock, we set a Management Target (MT) which ensures that, in the long run, the stock must exceed the CL in at least 4 years out of 5, this is the Management Objective (MO). Severn salmon stock assessments had been on an improving trend up to 2017, being classified as “Probably Not at Risk” at that time, but reduced stock assessments in 2018 and 2019 have meant that the classification has declined to the “Probably at Risk” category, and the ten-year trend is now declining slightly.

The nearby Wye and Usk salmon stocks have fallen below conservation limits and are also assessed to be “Probably at Risk”. Salmon stocks that are destined for these rivers are exploited by the Severn estuary net and putcher fisheries. The percentage of the respective Conservation Limits achieved by each river stock in 2019 compared to 2018 and 2017 are illustrated in figure 3.

Figure 3 Percentage CL reached by each river in 2019 compared to 2017 and 2018

Figure 3 Percentage CL reached by each river in 2019 compared to 2017 and 2018

The River Wye at 32% of the CL in 2019, indicates that this river is the weakest stock. The Severn salmon stock achieved 51% of its conservation limit in 2019, with the River Usk indicating the most significant decline over this period, with a slight recovery in 2019 to 70% having previously attained a 235% of CL in 2017.

Overall, the level of CL compliance for the Rivers Severn Wye and Usk indicate substantial deficits in the number of spawning adult salmon in these years, this will lead significant reductions in the number of juvenile fish produced in the next generation, with a risk of salmon CL compliance failure in the future..

The average population densities of juvenile salmon recorded from fisheries surveys conducted in the upper Severn catchment were at their lowest recorded levels in the 2019 survey. This is likely to reflect reduced numbers of spawning adult salmon in the preceding two years, and also suggests that smolt production might be reduced in 2020 and 2021 with consequent reduced adult salmon returns in 2022 and 2023.

Our stated aim for stocks in the “Probably At Risk” category is to recover these to “Probably Not At Risk” category within 5 years. The continued killing of salmon by both net and rod fisheries in such situations, and with such large spawning stock deficits, is not compatible with the aim of improving the stock status, particularly where the prevailing trends  in stocks are downwards.

Even relatively small numbers of fish could be crucial in order to aid recovery of stocks. There would be accumulated benefits over time. It is therefore essential that spawning stocks are maximized if populations are to have the best chance of recovery.

Preferred Options

We have considered a range of fishery management options to facilitate salmon stock recovery on all contributing rivers and to safeguard the sustainability and future of the salmon rod and net fisheries.

The preferred option for the Severn estuary net fisheries, in order to minimise their impact upon the River Severn salmon and sea trout stocks, as well as the salmon stocks in the nearby Wye and Usk SAC rivers, is as follows:

  • Implementation of byelaws prohibiting the use of the estuary draft net and putcher fisheries to capture salmon and sea trout for the next ten years.
  • Implementation of a byelaw requiring the mandatory catch and release of all salmon and sea trout caught by the lave net fishery for the next ten years.
  • Implementation of a Net Limitation Order to restrict the number of available lave net fishing licences to 22.

The preferred fishery management option for the River Severn rod fisheries, is as follows:

  • Implementation of a byelaw that requires the mandatory catch and release of all salmon and sea trout caught by rod and line.
  • Implementation of byelaws that control fishing methods, namely:
    1. prohibit bait fishing for salmon and sea trout;
    2. require the use of barbless hooks for fly fishing for salmon and sea trout;
    3. require the use of single, barbless (barbless or de-barbed) hooks with a maximum hook gape of no more than 13mm to be used with any artificial lures and spinners used to target salmon and sea trout;
    4. no more than 3 single, barbless hooks with a maximum hook gape of 13mm are to be fitted to wobbling or jointed plugs used to target salmon or sea trout;
    5. barbless single, double or treble hooks may be used in conjunction with a fly for salmon and sea trout. However, the maximum hook gape of any double or treble hook used in conjunction with an artificial fly shall be no greater than 7mm, and 13mm for single hooks.

Downloadable copies of the Byelaws and NLO are available in "Related" at the bottom of this webpage, together with the technical case. Text versions of the Byelaws and NLO for accessibility are available below

Consultation responses

There is a link below to an online survey. 

Here you can submit your response using our online tool which will enable you to manage your comments more effectively. It will also help us to gather and summarise responses quickly and accurately as well as reduce the costs of the consultation.

If you would prefer to submit your response by email, please use the following email address: freshwater.fish@defra.gov.uk Please also send a copy of your response to SevernSalmon@environment-agency.gov.uk

If you prefer to submit your response in writing, please use the following address: Migratory & Freshwater Fisheries (Salmon Byelaws), Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London, SW1P 3JR

What happens next?

All Consultation responses will be acknowledged and a response to questions will be provided. All consultation responses will be collated and forwarded to DEFRA, along with responses provided to questions, at the end of the consultation period for due consideration.

DEFRA will advise if alterations to the proposed regulations are required, or will recommend that the Fisheries Minister approves the proposed regulations for immediate implementation.

The Environment Agency will look to make all responses publicly available during and after the consultation, unless you have specifically requested that we keep your response confidential.

We will not publish names of individuals who respond, but we will publish the name of the organisation for those responses made on behalf of organisations.

If you respond online or provide us with an email address, we will acknowledge your response. After the consultation has closed a summary of the responses will be published on our website.

In accordance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000, we may be required to publish your response to this consultation, but will not include any personal information. If you have requested your response to be kept confidential, we may still be required to provide a summary of it.

  

More Information

Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975, Water Resources Act 1991, Environment Act 1995

SEVERN ESTUARY AND RIVER SEVERN SALMON AND SEA TROUT PROTECTION BYELAWS 2021

The Environment Agency in exercise of its powers under Section 210 of, and paragraphs 6(1)(b), 6(2)(c) and 6(2)(d) of Schedule 25 to, the Water Resources Act 1991 and all other powers enabling it in that behalf, makes the following Byelaws.

Byelaw 1 Application and Exemptions

  1. These byelaws apply to the River Severn estuary and those parts of the River Severn as defined in Byelaw 2 below.
  1. These Byelaws shall not apply to any employee of the Environment Agency acting in their official capacity or to any person who, with the permission in writing of the Environment Agency and acting in accordance with any conditions attached to that permission, carries out work connected with the maintenance, improvement or development of fisheries or for scientific purposes.
  1. These Byelaws shall expire 10 years after the date when they first come into force

Byelaw 2 Interpretation

  1. In these Byelaws:

“the Agency” means the Environment Agency;

“Salmon” means both species Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Pink salmon (Onchrynchus gorbuscha);

“Sea trout” means any migratory (anadromous) form of the species Salmo trutta which are commonly known as sea trout (migratory trout) or sewin and also includes part of a sea trout.

“Artificial fly” means a fishing fly that is primarily constructed from natural or synthetic fur and feather materials and which is designed to attract fish and which incorporates a fishing hook.

“Artificial lure” means any device, including spoons, spinners, wobblers and plugs, or artificial imitation fish baits made of any material which is designed to attract fish and which incorporates a fishing hook or hooks;

“Bait” means any worm, prawn and shrimp whether natural or artificial;

"Barbless" means a hook with no barb or a hook with a fully crushed barb only;

“Hook gape” means the widest opening of a hook used for rod and line fishing, the dimensions of which are measured from hook point directly across to the shank of the hook;

“Draft net” means an unarmoured net, without bags or pockets, worked by more than one person during any portion of the time of its use, and drawn out of the water onto the bank, whether from a boat or otherwise, for the purpose of securing the fish, and consisting of a single sheet of netting which measures not more than 185 metres in length in the waters of the River Severn below or downstream of the Lower Parting, Gloucester (SO81600 18900) and 95 metres in length in all other parts of the River Severn estuary, such measurement to be made when the net is wet;

“Lave net” means a single sheet of netting of mesh which measures, when wet, not less than 50mm in extension from knot to knot or 200mm round the perimeter for knotted mesh, or not less than 25mm in extension or 100mm round the perimeter for knotless mesh, and which shall be constructed to form a bag or purse attached to a yoke in the shape of a ‘V’, the widest part of which shall not exceed 3 metres and which shall be fitted with a handstaff to the apex of the yoke;

“Putcher basket “means a single or multiple tier or rank of putcher baskets that are designed to capture salmon and which have historically been licensed for use within the Severn Estuary and shall be conical in shape with a round mouth measuring a maximum of 75cm at its widest point across;

“River Severn” means the area of the natural catchment of the River Severn and of all watercourses draining or flowing, directly or indirectly, into it, reaching an imaginary line drawn between Beachley Point (NGR ST54800 90300) and Avonmouth (NGR ST51200 79700) and which passes through both the Shoots (NGR ST51600 86500) and a point offshore from Avonmouth (NGR ST49800 80600) which are wholly within England;

“River Severn estuary” means all of the tidal waters of the Severn estuary upstream of an imaginary line drawn between Beachley Point (NGR ST54800 90300) and Avonmouth (NGR ST51200 79700) and which passes through both the Shoots (NGR ST51600 86500) and a point offshore from Avonmouth (NGR ST49800 80600) and then upstream to the tidal limit at Maisemoor Weir (SO81806 21669) which are wholly within England.

(2)        Except where expressly stated or where the context otherwise requires all words and expressions used in these Byelaws shall have the meanings assigned to them by the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975, Water Resources Act 1991 and the Environment Act 1995

Byelaw 3 Catch and release of salmon and sea trout taken by means of lave net within the River Severn estuary

  1. No person shall retain a live or dead salmon or sea trout that has been taken by a licensed lave net within the River Severn estuary.
  1. Any salmon or sea trout caught when operating with a licensed lave net within the River Severn estuary must be returned immediately to the water at the point of capture with the least possible injury.

Byelaw 4 Prohibition on catching salmon and sea trout by draft net within the River Severn estuary

No person shall fish for salmon or sea trout within the River Severn estuary by means of a draft net.

Byelaw 5 Prohibition of catching salmon and sea trout by putcher within the River Severn estuary.

No person shall fish for salmon or sea trout within the River Severn estuary by means of a putcher basket or rank of putcher baskets. 

Byelaw 6 Prohibition on the retention of salmon or sea trout from the River Severn taken by rod and line

  1. No person shall remove or retain a salmon or sea trout that has been taken by rod and line in the River Severn.
  1. Any salmon or sea trout that has been taken by rod and line shall be returned immediately to the water at the point of capture with the least possible injury.

Byelaw 7 Prohibition of methods for fishing for salmon and sea trout by rod and line within the River Severn

  1. No person shall fish for, take or attempt to fish for or attempt to take any salmon or sea trout with rod and line within the River Severn by any means other than an artificial fly or artificial lure.
  1. No person shall fish for, take or attempt to fish for or attempt to take any salmon or sea trout within the River Severn with rod and line by means of any bait.
  1. No person shall fish for, take or attempt to fish for or attempt to take any salmon or sea trout with rod and line within the River Severn using an artificial lure or fly unless fitted with barbless or de-barbed hooks
  1. No person shall fish for, take or attempt to fish for salmon or sea trout within the River Severn catchment using artificial lures unless fitted with one single barbless or de-barbed hook with a maximum gape of 13 millimetres measured from the shank to the point. The restriction to one single hook shall not apply to wobblers, plugs or artificial imitation baits which are allowed up to a maximum of 3 single barbless or de-barbed hooks with each single hook having a maximum hook gape of no more than 13 millimetres.
  1. No person shall fish for, take or attempt to fish for, or attempt to take any salmon or sea trout within the River Severn with an artificial fly unless furnished with either a single barbless or de-barbed hook with a maximum hook gape of 13 millimetres or a single barbless or de-barbed treble or double hook with the maximum hook gape of any treble or double hook(s) being no greater than 7 millimetres.

More Information

SALMON AND FRESHWATER FISHERIES ACT 1975, AS AMENDED

BY THE ENVIRONMENT ACT 1995 AND MARINE AND COASTAL ACCESS ACT 2009

ENVIRONMENT AGENCY (LIMITATION OF SEVERN ESTUARY LAVE

NET FISHING LICENCES IN ENGLAND) ORDER 2021

THE ENVIRONMENT AGENCY, in exercise of the powers vested in it by section 26(1) of the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975 and being satisfied that it is necessary to do so for the purposes of section 26(1A)(a) and (b) makes the following Order:-

Citation, Commencement and Period of Operation

1.         This Order -

(1)       may be cited as the Environment Agency (Limitation of Severn Estuary Lave Net Fishing Licences in England) Order 2021;

(2)       comes into force on the date it is confirmed by the Secretary of State for  Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, and;

(3)       applies to the area described in column (1) of the Schedule.

Interpretation  

2.         “Lave net” means a single sheet of netting of mesh which measures, when wet, not less than 50mm in extension from knot to knot or 200mm round the perimeter for knotted mesh, or not less than 25mm in extension or 100mm round the perimeter for knotless mesh, and which shall be constructed to form a bag or purse attached to a yoke in the shape of a ‘V’, the widest part of which shall not exceed 3 metres and which shall be fitted with a handstaff to the apex of the yoke. The lave net shall be operated by one person standing or wading in the water and supporting or holding the net and lifting or scooping any fish.

“Agency” means the Environment Agency or any subsequent successor in title.

“Licence” means a fishing licence issued by the Agency for the use of a lave net for fishing for salmon and migratory trout other than rainbow trout.

“Salmon” means both Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Pink salmon (Onchrynchus gorbuscha).

“Migratory trout” means the migratory form of the brown trout (Salmo trutta) otherwise known as the sea trout.

Limitation of licences

3.     The number of lave net licences to be issued in each year for the area specified in column (1) of the Schedule shall be limited to the number and type specified in column (2) of the Schedule.

Issue of fishing licences

4.         (1)       In issuing a lave net licence the Agency shall give preference to any person who demonstrates to its satisfaction that person held a lave net licence in 2018 (two thousand and eighteen) or in either of the 2 (two) years preceding the year in which the licence is to be issued, for the area described in column (1) of the Schedule.

             (2) Not more than 1 (one) lave net licence shall be issued to any one person in respect of the area described in column (1) of the Schedule.

             (3) In considering an application for a lave net licence the Agency may require the applicant to provide such information as it considers relevant and in such form as it may prescribe.

Applications for fishing licences

5.         An application for a lave net licence under this Order shall be made to the office specified in column (3) of the Schedule no later than 2 (two) months prior to the start date of the lave net fishing season.

Reissue of fishing licences

6.         (1)       Subject to paragraph (2), if the holder of a lave net licence issued under this Order dies, that licence may be re-issued on such basis and in accordance with such procedure as the Agency considers appropriate.

            (2)       A lave net licence cannot be re-issued if the number of lave net licences issued in any given year for the area described in column (1) of the Schedule exceeds the number prescribed in column (2) of the Schedule.

Expiry

7.         This Order will expire on the date 10 (ten) years after the date it came into force, unless revoked earlier.

Why your views matter

River Severn salmon populations have declined in recent years and are now falling below the Conservation Limit (CL) target that is deemed necessary to sustain the populations at a healthy and sustainable level. The stock is therefore in need of more protection than has previously been in place. Similar levels of declining salmon stock status have been observed on the River Usk and Wye in recent years resulting in NRW implementing measures to protect salmon.

Previous time-limited regulations for salmon and sea trout fishing on the River Severn for both rod and net fisheries need to be renewed and updated to ensure that salmon stocks are adequately protected. This is to ensure that those fisheries that continue to exploit these stocks do so in a sustainable manner to support stock recovery as quickly as possible.

We would like to hear your thoughts on the salmon and sea trout stock assessments, the status of salmon stocks on the River Severn and proposed new regulations. Please provide data or evidence that you believe is relevant to justify your comments and which may justify the need to modify or strengthen the proposed measures. [Please note the online consultation is now closed - the public consultation ran for a period of one month from March to April 2021

What happens next

[Please note the online consultation is now closed - the public consultation ran for a period of one month from March to April 2021. This section is retained for audit purposes to show the overview pages as they were while the consultation was live.]

All Consultation responses will be acknowledged and a response to questions will be provided. All consultation responses will be collated and forwarded to DEFRA, along with responses provided to questions, at the end of the consultation period for due consideration.

DEFRA will advise if alterations to the proposed regulations are required, or will recommend that the Fisheries Minister approves the proposed regulations for immediate implementation.

The Environment Agency will look to make all responses publicly available during and after the consultation, unless you have specifically requested that we keep your response confidential.

We will not publish names of individuals who respond, but we will publish the name of the organisation for those responses made on behalf of organisations.

If you respond online or provide us with an email address, we will acknowledge your response. After the consultation has closed a summary of the responses will be published on our website.

In accordance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000, we may be required to publish your response to this consultation, but will not include any personal information. If you have requested your response to be kept confidential, we may still be required to provide a summary of it.

Audiences

  • Recreational and commercial river users
  • Fishing clubs and representative associations
  • Members of the public with an interest in the river, the species and conservation
  • Businesses
  • Charities
  • Statutory organisations
  • NGOs
  • Members of the public
  • Elected representatives, including MPs
  • Local councils
  • Academics
  • Environment Agency customers
  • Net fishing license holders
  • River based salmon angling owners/fishing clubs/organisations
  • Individual migratory salmonid licence holders
  • Business that buy salmon/supported by salmon net and rod fishing
  • Angling trade contacts
  • National based fishery, conservation and landowner organisations
  • Government family organisations

Interests

  • Business and industry
  • Fishing and boating
  • Habitats and wildlife