Response 192941386

Back to Response listing

Seeking your views

4. Please provide your comments on the environmental permit application received from Day Group Limited

Please provide your comments on the environmental permit application received from Day Group Limited (Required)
Avonmouth has as you must know many dust producing plants already, most residents feel that there are in fact already too many. The Day Group class the Bottom Ash as non-hazardous and yet when asked at their presentation what it was composed of they couldn't or wouldn't say. The only substance that they could come up with was Silica, if the Bottom Ash is non-hazardous as both the Day Group and the EA claim then where is the chemical analysis to back this claim and as composition of Bottom ash will change from day to day depending what they burn in the incinerators, each shipment would need to be tested to substantiate the non hazardous claim. About 4 years ago the EA unsuccessfully prosecuted a wood chipping company I believe they were called GKNI,who were operating on the same site as the Day groups proposed plant. In his summing up the judge criticised the EA saying "I cannot understand why the Environment Agency would permit a plant such as this to operate so close to where people live." In my view that still holds true today with regards to the proposed Bottom Ash plant. The Bottom ash is in my view not non-hazardous as you claim in your document but toxic, it needs to maturize (this is the word used by the Day group) for 3 weeks to allow gasses to escape and become less toxic before it can be processed. The Bottom Ash as a wet sludge is transported across the Bristol Channel from Cardiff to Avonmouth Dock and then unloaded with a grab crane and loaded onto a lorry which will then transport it the short distance to the proposed plant, who will be ensuring that there will be no spillage of this toxic sludge, will this part of the operation be permitted by the EA. To sum up. This plant is not wanted by the residents of Avonmouth, who are still suffering from previous mistakes made by the Environment Agency.